KUSI-TV – New Plant Technology – Salk News Clip – Part3

KUSI-TV – New Plant Technology – Salk News Clip – Part3

Discovery may help protect crops from stressors

Salk findings of a key genetic mechanism in plant hormone signaling may help save crops from stress and help address human hunger

Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have discovered a key genetic switch by which plants control their response to ethylene gas, a natural plant hormone best known for its ability to ripen fruit, but which, under stress conditions, can cause wilted leaves, premature aging and spoilage from over-ripening. The findings, published August 30 in Science magazine, may hold the key to manipulating plants’ ethylene on/off switch, allowing them to balance between drought resistance and growth and, therefore, decrease crop losses from drought conditions.

Discovery may help protect crops from stressors
Salk findings of a key genetic mechanism in plant hormone signaling may help save crops from stress and help address human hunger
August 30, 2012
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LA JOLLA, CA—Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have discovered a key genetic switch by which plants control their response to ethylene gas, a natural plant hormone best known for its ability to ripen fruit, but which, under stress conditions, can cause wilted leaves, premature aging and spoilage from over-ripening. The findings, published August 30 in Science magazine, may hold the key to manipulating plants’ ethylene on/off switch, allowing them to balance between drought resistance and growth and, therefore, decrease crop losses from drought conditions.

“In different stress conditions—flooding, drought, chilling, wounding or pathogen attack—ethylene tells plants to make adjustments to these adverse changes,” says senior study author Joseph Ecker, a professor in Salk’s Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Laboratory and Howard Hughes Medical Institute-Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation investigator. “Our study discovered a key step in how plants ‘smell’ ethylene gas, which may lead to better ways to control these processes in crop plants.”